A microcircuit model of prefrontal functions: Ying and Yang of reverberatory neurodynamics in cognition

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In contrast to neural systems responsible for sensory processing or motor behavior, the prefrontal cortex is a quintessentially “cognitive” structure. A bewildering gamut of complex higher brain processes depend on prefrontal cortex. It is thus a particularly challenging quest to elucidate the neurobiology of prefrontal functions at the mechanistic level. Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic voiced this difficulty in 1987: Unlike largely sensory and motor skills, the mnemonic, associative, and command functions of the mammalian brain have eluded precise neurological explanation. The proposition that cognitive function(s) can be localized to specialized neuronal circuits is not easy to defend because the neural interactions that underlie even the most simple concept or solution of an abstract problem have not been convincingly demonstrated. Also it does not seem possible to conceptualize in neural terms what it means to generate an idea, to grasp the essentials of a situation, to be oriented in space and time, or to plan for long-range goals. Furthermore we are still learning how to formulate the structure-function problem in a way that can lead to fruitful experimentation, theory building, or modeling in terms of neural systems or synaptic mechanisms. Since these words were written, some of the impediments have begun to yield ground, partly thanks to the development of novel techniques linking cognitive functions with underlying neural processes. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) has opened up a window with which brain activity can be probed and dissected during behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Frontal Lobes: Development, Function, and Pathology
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages92-127
Number of pages36
ISBN (Print)9780511545917, 0521672252, 9780521672252
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Cognition
Prefrontal Cortex
Brain
Motor Skills
Neurobiology
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Wang, X-J. (2006). A microcircuit model of prefrontal functions: Ying and Yang of reverberatory neurodynamics in cognition. In The Frontal Lobes: Development, Function, and Pathology (pp. 92-127). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545917.006

A microcircuit model of prefrontal functions : Ying and Yang of reverberatory neurodynamics in cognition. / Wang, Xiao-Jing.

The Frontal Lobes: Development, Function, and Pathology. Cambridge University Press, 2006. p. 92-127.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wang, X-J 2006, A microcircuit model of prefrontal functions: Ying and Yang of reverberatory neurodynamics in cognition. in The Frontal Lobes: Development, Function, and Pathology. Cambridge University Press, pp. 92-127. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545917.006
Wang X-J. A microcircuit model of prefrontal functions: Ying and Yang of reverberatory neurodynamics in cognition. In The Frontal Lobes: Development, Function, and Pathology. Cambridge University Press. 2006. p. 92-127 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545917.006
Wang, Xiao-Jing. / A microcircuit model of prefrontal functions : Ying and Yang of reverberatory neurodynamics in cognition. The Frontal Lobes: Development, Function, and Pathology. Cambridge University Press, 2006. pp. 92-127
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