A meta-analysis of the hepatitis C virus distribution in diverse racial/ethnic drug injector groups

Corina Lelutiu-Weinberger, Enrique R. Pouget, Don Des Jarlais, Hannah L. Cooper, Roberta Scheinmann, Rebecca Stern, Shiela M. Strauss, Holly Hagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is mostly transmitted through blood-to-blood contact during injection drug use via shared contaminated syringes/needles or injection paraphernalia. This paper used meta-analytic methods to assess whether HCV prevalence and incidence varied across different racial/ethnic groups of injection drug users (IDUs) sampled internationally. The 29 prevalence and 11 incidence studies identified as part of the HCV Synthesis Project were categorized into subgroups based on similar racial/ethnic comparisons. The effect estimate used was the odds or risk ratio comparing HCV prevalence or incidence rates in racial/ethnic minority groups versus those of majority status. For prevalence studies, the clearest disparity in HCV status was observed in the Canadian and Australian Aboriginal versus White comparison, followed by the US non-White versus White categories. Overall, Hispanic IDUs had greater HCV prevalence, and HCV prevalence in African-Americans was not significantly greater than that of Whites in the US. Aboriginal groups showed higher HCV seroconversion rates when compared to others, and African-Americans had lower seroconversion rates compared to other IDUs in the US. The findings suggest that certain minority groups have elevated HCV rates in comparison to other IDUs, which may be a consequence of stigma, discrimination, different risk behaviors or decreased access to health care, services and preventive education. Future research should seek to explicitly explore and explain racial/ethnic variations in HCV prevalence and incidence, and define the groups more precisely to allow for more accurate detection of possible racial/ethnic differences in HCV rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-590
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Hepacivirus
contagious disease
Meta-Analysis
drug
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Group
Drug Users
Injections
incidence
Minority Groups
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Incidence
Meta-analysis
Drugs
Virus
Odds Ratio
Health Services Accessibility
Syringes
health care services

Keywords

  • Health disparities
  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV)
  • Injection drug use (IDU)
  • Meta-analysis
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)

Cite this

A meta-analysis of the hepatitis C virus distribution in diverse racial/ethnic drug injector groups. / Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Pouget, Enrique R.; Des Jarlais, Don; Cooper, Hannah L.; Scheinmann, Roberta; Stern, Rebecca; Strauss, Shiela M.; Hagan, Holly.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 68, No. 3, 02.2009, p. 579-590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina ; Pouget, Enrique R. ; Des Jarlais, Don ; Cooper, Hannah L. ; Scheinmann, Roberta ; Stern, Rebecca ; Strauss, Shiela M. ; Hagan, Holly. / A meta-analysis of the hepatitis C virus distribution in diverse racial/ethnic drug injector groups. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 579-590.
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