A longitudinal study of syringe acquisition by Puerto Rican injection drug users in New York and Puerto Rico: Implications for syringe exchange and distribution programs

H. Finlinson, Denise Oliver-Vélez, Sherry Deren, John Cant, Héctor Colón, Rafaela Robles, Sung Yeon Kang, Jonny Andía

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increasing access to sterile syringes and new drug preparation materials is an effective means of reducing HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), and a fundamental component of harm reduction ideology. The purpose of this study is to examine changes during a three-year period in syringe acquisition by street-recruited Puerto Rican IDUs characterized by frequent drug injection and high HIV seroprevalence. At baseline (1998-1999) and 36-month follow-up, 103 IDUs recruited in East Harlem, New York (NY), and 135 from Bayamón, Puerto Rico (PR) were surveyed about syringe sources and HIV risk behaviors in the prior 30 days. A majority of participants in both sites were male (NY 78.6%, PR 84.4%), were born in Puerto Rico (NY 59.2%, PR 87.4%), and had not completed high school (NY 56.3%, PR 51.9%). Compared to PR IDUs at follow-up, NY IDUs injected less (3.4 vs. 7.0 times/day, p <.001), and re-used syringes less (3.1 vs. 8.0 times, p <.001). Between baseline and follow-up, in NY the proportion of syringes from syringe exchange programs (SEPs) increased from 54.2% to 72.9% (p = .001); syringes from pharmacies did not increase significantly (0.2% to 2.5%, p = .095). In PR, the proportions of syringes from major sources did not change significantly: private sellers (50.9% to 50.9%, p = .996); pharmacies (18.6% to 19.0%, p = .867); SEP (12.8% to 14.4%, p = .585). The study indicates that NY SEPs became more dominant, while NY pharmacies remained a minor source even though a law enacted in 2001 legalized syringe purchases without prescription. Private sellers in PR remained the dominant and most expensive source. The only source of free syringes, the SEP, permitted more syringes to be exchanged but the increase was not statistically significant. Implications for syringe exchange and distribution programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1313-1336
Number of pages24
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Fingerprint

Needle-Exchange Programs
Puerto Rico
Syringes
Drug Users
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
drug
Injections
Pharmacies
HIV Seroprevalence
HIV
Harm Reduction
Drug Compounding
risk behavior
purchase
Risk-Taking
medication
ideology
Prescriptions

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Injection drug users
  • New York
  • Puerto Rico
  • Risk-reduction materials
  • Syringe Exchange Program (SEP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A longitudinal study of syringe acquisition by Puerto Rican injection drug users in New York and Puerto Rico : Implications for syringe exchange and distribution programs. / Finlinson, H.; Oliver-Vélez, Denise; Deren, Sherry; Cant, John; Colón, Héctor; Robles, Rafaela; Kang, Sung Yeon; Andía, Jonny.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 41, No. 9, 01.08.2006, p. 1313-1336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Finlinson, H. ; Oliver-Vélez, Denise ; Deren, Sherry ; Cant, John ; Colón, Héctor ; Robles, Rafaela ; Kang, Sung Yeon ; Andía, Jonny. / A longitudinal study of syringe acquisition by Puerto Rican injection drug users in New York and Puerto Rico : Implications for syringe exchange and distribution programs. In: Substance Use and Misuse. 2006 ; Vol. 41, No. 9. pp. 1313-1336.
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