A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries

Jennifer E. Lansford, Darren Woodlief, Patrick S. Malone, Paul Oburu, Concetta Pastorelli, Ann T. Skinner, Emma Sorbring, Sombat Tapanya, Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado, Arnaldo Zelli, Suha M. Al-Hassan, Liane Peña Alampay, Dario Bacchini, Anna Silvia Bombi, Marc H. Bornstein, Lei Chang, Kirby Deater-Deckard, Laura Di Giunta, Kenneth A. Dodge

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study examined whether parents' social information processing was related to their subsequent reports of their harsh discipline. Interviews were conducted with mothers (n = 1,277) and fathers (n = 1,030) of children in 1,297 families in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States), initially when children were 7 to 9 years old and again 1 year later. Structural equation models showed that parents' positive evaluations of aggressive responses to hypothetical childrearing vignettes at Time 1 predicted parents' self-reported harsh physical and nonphysical discipline at Time 2. This link was consistent across mothers and fathers, and across the nine countries, providing support for the universality of the link between positive evaluations of harsh discipline and parents' aggressive behavior toward children. The results suggest that international efforts to eliminate violence toward children could target parents' beliefs about the acceptability and advisability of using harsh physical and nonphysical forms of discipline.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)561-573
    Number of pages13
    JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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    Automatic Data Processing
    Fathers
    Parents
    Mothers
    Jordan
    Philippines
    Colombia
    Kenya
    Structural Models
    Child Behavior
    Thailand
    Violence
    Sweden
    Italy
    China
    Interviews

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Lansford, J. E., Woodlief, D., Malone, P. S., Oburu, P., Pastorelli, C., Skinner, A. T., ... Dodge, K. A. (2014). A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries. Development and Psychopathology, 26(3), 561-573. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579414000236

    A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries. / Lansford, Jennifer E.; Woodlief, Darren; Malone, Patrick S.; Oburu, Paul; Pastorelli, Concetta; Skinner, Ann T.; Sorbring, Emma; Tapanya, Sombat; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe; Zelli, Arnaldo; Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Alampay, Liane Peña; Bacchini, Dario; Bombi, Anna Silvia; Bornstein, Marc H.; Chang, Lei; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Di Giunta, Laura; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 561-573.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lansford, JE, Woodlief, D, Malone, PS, Oburu, P, Pastorelli, C, Skinner, AT, Sorbring, E, Tapanya, S, Tirado, LMU, Zelli, A, Al-Hassan, SM, Alampay, LP, Bacchini, D, Bombi, AS, Bornstein, MH, Chang, L, Deater-Deckard, K, Di Giunta, L & Dodge, KA 2014, 'A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries', Development and Psychopathology, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 561-573. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579414000236
    Lansford, Jennifer E. ; Woodlief, Darren ; Malone, Patrick S. ; Oburu, Paul ; Pastorelli, Concetta ; Skinner, Ann T. ; Sorbring, Emma ; Tapanya, Sombat ; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe ; Zelli, Arnaldo ; Al-Hassan, Suha M. ; Alampay, Liane Peña ; Bacchini, Dario ; Bombi, Anna Silvia ; Bornstein, Marc H. ; Chang, Lei ; Deater-Deckard, Kirby ; Di Giunta, Laura ; Dodge, Kenneth A. / A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries. In: Development and Psychopathology. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 561-573.
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