A decision theoretic and prototype conceptualization of possible selves: Implications for the prediction of risk behavior

Shannon L. Quinlan, James Jaccard, Hart Blanton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The present study explores a new framework for conceptualizing possible selves for the prediction of behavior. The framework uses decision theory, attitude theory, and classic expectancy-value models. The focus is on using possible-self constructs that (a) correspond to behavioral alternatives, (b) focus on self dimensions directly tied to the behavioral criterion, and (c) use expectancy-value constructs to assess the core features of a given possible self-dimension. A study of 305 college students was undertaken to predict alcohol use from possible self constructs using the framework. Results affirmed the utility of the approach, showing that possible-self constructs predicted behavior over and above current self-image and constructs in the Theory of Planned Behavior. Possible-self constructs associated with negative attributes of both binge drinkers and nonbinge drinkers were predictive of behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-630
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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Risk-Taking
Decision Theory
Alcohols
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

A decision theoretic and prototype conceptualization of possible selves : Implications for the prediction of risk behavior. / Quinlan, Shannon L.; Jaccard, James; Blanton, Hart.

In: Journal of Personality, Vol. 74, No. 2, 04.2006, p. 599-630.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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