A Controlled Evaluation of Thermal Biofeedback and Thermal Biofeedback Combined With Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Headache

Edward B. Blanchard, Kenneth A. Appelbaum, Cynthia L. Radnitz, Belinda Morrill, Denise Michultka, Cynthia Kirsch, Patricia Guarnieri, Joel Hillhouse, Donald D. Evans, James Jaccard, Kevin D. Barron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One-hundred-sixteen patients suffering from vascular headache (migraine or combined migraine and tension) were, after 4 weeks of pretreatment baseline headache monitoring, randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) thermal biofeedback with adjunctive relaxation training (TBF); (b) TBF plus cognitive therapy; (c) pseudomeditation as an ostensible attention-placebo control; or (d) headache monitoring. The first three groups received 16 individual sessions over 8 weeks, while the fourth group continued to monitor headaches. All groups then monitored headaches for a 4-week posttreatment baseline. Analyses revealed that all treated groups improved significantly more than the headache monitoring group with no significant differences among the three treated groups. On a measure of clinically significant improvement, the two TBF groups had slightly higher (51%) degree of improvement than the meditation group (37.5%). It is argued that the attention-placebo control became an active relaxation condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-224
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume58
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1990

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Vascular Headaches
Cognitive Therapy
Headache
Hot Temperature
Migraine Disorders
Placebos
Therapeutics
Meditation
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Therapy
Monitoring
Controlled
Evaluation
Placebo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Blanchard, E. B., Appelbaum, K. A., Radnitz, C. L., Morrill, B., Michultka, D., Kirsch, C., ... Barron, K. D. (1990). A Controlled Evaluation of Thermal Biofeedback and Thermal Biofeedback Combined With Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Headache. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 58(2), 216-224.

A Controlled Evaluation of Thermal Biofeedback and Thermal Biofeedback Combined With Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Headache. / Blanchard, Edward B.; Appelbaum, Kenneth A.; Radnitz, Cynthia L.; Morrill, Belinda; Michultka, Denise; Kirsch, Cynthia; Guarnieri, Patricia; Hillhouse, Joel; Evans, Donald D.; Jaccard, James; Barron, Kevin D.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 58, No. 2, 04.1990, p. 216-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blanchard, EB, Appelbaum, KA, Radnitz, CL, Morrill, B, Michultka, D, Kirsch, C, Guarnieri, P, Hillhouse, J, Evans, DD, Jaccard, J & Barron, KD 1990, 'A Controlled Evaluation of Thermal Biofeedback and Thermal Biofeedback Combined With Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Headache', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 216-224.
Blanchard, Edward B. ; Appelbaum, Kenneth A. ; Radnitz, Cynthia L. ; Morrill, Belinda ; Michultka, Denise ; Kirsch, Cynthia ; Guarnieri, Patricia ; Hillhouse, Joel ; Evans, Donald D. ; Jaccard, James ; Barron, Kevin D. / A Controlled Evaluation of Thermal Biofeedback and Thermal Biofeedback Combined With Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Headache. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1990 ; Vol. 58, No. 2. pp. 216-224.
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