A comparison of six methods for assessing the importance of perceived consequences in behavioral decisions: Applications from attitude research

James Jaccard, Diana Sheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Six different approaches to measuring the importance of perceived consequences in behavioral decisions were compared: (1) an elicitation approach, (2) a subjective probability model, (3) Jacoby's behavioral process technology, (4) a Bayesian model, (5) a direct rating approach, and (6) a correlational approach. The convergence among the methods was evaluated for two different decision topics: (1) emphasizing a career relative to marriage, and (2) use of birth control pills. Results indicated that the six approaches yielded estimates of importance that were, by and large, unrelated to each other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-28
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

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attitude research
comparison of methods
Marriage
Contraception
Technology
Research
family planning
marriage
rating
career

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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