A closer look at Neanderthal postcanine dental morphology: The mandibular dentition

Shara Bailey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Neanderthals are known to exhibit unique incisor morphology as well as enlarged pulp chambers in postcanine teeth (taurodontism). Recent studies suggest that their overall dental pattern (i.e., in morphologic trait frequencies) is also unique. However, what this means in a phylogenetic sense is not known. Although exploring the polarity of dental morphologic characters is essential to understanding the phylogenetic implications of unique patterns of variation, few have undertaken this task. This study moves beyond standard scoring methods, which are based on modern humans, to include several postcanine traits that have not been considered previously. In addition, Homo erectus is used as an outgroup to Neanderthals and modern humans to explore the polarity of these traits. The findings of this study suggest that Neanderthals are not only unique in their pattern of dental trait frequencies (as found in previous studies) but that they present several dental autapomorphies, as well. These include a high frequency of the mid-trigonid crest in lower molars and unique morphology of the lower premolars. Interestingly, these characters are not observed in the Mauer mandible, which some have claimed to be a member of a chronospecies that is a unique ancestor to Neanderthals.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)148-156
    Number of pages9
    JournalAnatomical Record
    Volume269
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 15 2002

    Fingerprint

    Neanderthals
    Neanderthal
    Dentition
    dentition
    Tooth
    teeth
    phylogenetics
    ancestry
    Dental Pulp Cavity
    tooth
    Bicuspid
    phylogeny
    Hominidae
    Homo
    Incisor
    Mandible
    pulp
    Research Design

    Keywords

    • Comparative anatomy
    • Dental morphology
    • Hominoid postcanine teeth
    • Homo erectus
    • Homo heidelbergensis
    • Homo sapiens
    • Human evolution
    • Neanderthals

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
    • Anatomy

    Cite this

    A closer look at Neanderthal postcanine dental morphology : The mandibular dentition. / Bailey, Shara.

    In: Anatomical Record, Vol. 269, No. 3, 15.06.2002, p. 148-156.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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