A closer look at choice

Sara M. Constantino, Nathaniel D. Daw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We often look back and forth between options before deciding which one to choose, even if we have seen them both before. A new study suggests that people are biased to choose things they look at more, providing new insight into how the subjective values of options are constructed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1154
Number of pages2
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Constantino, S. M., & Daw, N. D. (2010). A closer look at choice. Nature Neuroscience, 13(10), 1153-1154. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1010-1153

A closer look at choice. / Constantino, Sara M.; Daw, Nathaniel D.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. 10, 2010, p. 1153-1154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Constantino, SM & Daw, ND 2010, 'A closer look at choice', Nature Neuroscience, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 1153-1154. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1010-1153
Constantino, Sara M. ; Daw, Nathaniel D. / A closer look at choice. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1153-1154.
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