A C-RING-like domain participates in protein self-assembly and mineral nucleation

Fairland F. Amos, Moise Ndao, Christopher B. Ponce, John Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AP7 is a nacre-associated protein of the mollusk shell that forms supramolecular assemblies that nucleate single-crystal aragonite in vitro. AP7 possesses two major sequence regions: a random coil 30-amino acid N-terminal domain (AP7N) and a partially disordered 36-amino acid C-terminal domain (AP7C) that exhibits imperfect sequence homology to the C subclass of the intracellular RING domain family. We report here new findings that implicate the C-RING domain in AP7-mediated supramolecular assembly and single-crystal mineral formation. AP7 protein spontaneously self-assembles over a pH range of 4-9 and is monomeric at pH >9.5. AP7N and AP7C both oligomerize over the pH range of 4-9, with the AP7C sequence closely resembling AP7 in terms of particle morphology and size. In vitro mineralization experiments demonstrate that both AP7N and AP7C form supramolecular assemblies that nucleate single-crystal calcium carbonates. Comparison of previously published nuclear magnetic resonance-based structures of AP7C and AP7N reveals the significant presence of complementary anionic-cationic electrostatic molecular surfaces on AP7C that are not found on AP7N, and this may explain the noted discrepancies between the two domains in terms of self-assembly and single-crystal nucleation. We conclude that the C-RING-like sequence is an important site for AP7 self-association and mineral nucleation, and this represents the first known instance of a RING-like sequence performing these functions within an extracellular protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8880-8887
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemistry
Volume50
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 18 2011

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Self assembly
Minerals
Nucleation
Calcium Carbonate
Single crystals
Nacre
Amino Acids
Proteins
Mollusca
Sequence Homology
Static Electricity
Particle Size
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Electrostatics
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Association reactions
In Vitro Techniques
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

A C-RING-like domain participates in protein self-assembly and mineral nucleation. / Amos, Fairland F.; Ndao, Moise; Ponce, Christopher B.; Evans, John.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 50, No. 41, 18.10.2011, p. 8880-8887.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amos, Fairland F. ; Ndao, Moise ; Ponce, Christopher B. ; Evans, John. / A C-RING-like domain participates in protein self-assembly and mineral nucleation. In: Biochemistry. 2011 ; Vol. 50, No. 41. pp. 8880-8887.
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